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Mothers, Daughters and Othermothers: The Significance of Storytelling in Shaping my Identity as an African Woman

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dc.contributor.author Shoboiki, Abimbola S.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-23T13:51:36Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-23T13:51:36Z
dc.date.issued 2019-04
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10587/1948
dc.description.abstract My work is not just a story. It is a story of my childhood experiences, perspectives, values, assumptions and beliefs that have shaped my current understanding as a West African woman in and outside of the classroom. My work will examine how stories are rooted in a broad sense of kinship and responsibility, a responsibility to honour my mother, grandmother and othermothers who were my first role models and teachers. I discuss storytelling as a research methodology. My work will also explore the meaning of motherhood in African culture and mother-daughter relationships addressing three primary questions. First, how have competing perspectives about motherhood intersected to produce a distinctly Afrocentric ideology of motherhood? Second, what are the enduring themes that characterize the Afrocentric ideology of motherhood? Finally, what effect might this Afrocentric ideology of motherhood have on African mother-daughter relationship? en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Mount Saint Vincent University en_US
dc.subject Storytelling, motherhood, African women en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.title Mothers, Daughters and Othermothers: The Significance of Storytelling in Shaping my Identity as an African Woman en_US
dc.format.availability Full-text en_US


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