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Trying to Help: A Consideration of how Non-Aboriginal Educators Working Among First Nations Populations may be Particularly Susceptible to the Effects of Culture Shock.

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dc.contributor.author Frost, Grant G.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-04-21T14:14:42Z
dc.date.available 2009-04-21T14:14:42Z
dc.date.issued 2007-09
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10587/298
dc.description.abstract A review of a variety of literature related to the topic of culture shock was carried out. This information, including such things as models, definitions, causes and cures was then considered in light of literature and personal reflection on teaching in First Nations communities as a non-Native educator. Evidence is provided to support the notion that non-Native teachers working among Aboriginal populations may be very susceptible to the onset of culture shock. Recommendations are made based on this evidence for teacher educators, teacher sojourners, and First Nations communities. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Ethnopsychology en
dc.subject Cross-cultural orientation en
dc.subject Educational anthropology en
dc.subject Aboriginal peoples en
dc.subject First Nations en
dc.subject Attitudes en
dc.subject Culture shock en
dc.subject Psychology en
dc.subject Teachers en
dc.subject Canada en
dc.subject Education en
dc.subject Indigenous peoples en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.title Trying to Help: A Consideration of how Non-Aboriginal Educators Working Among First Nations Populations may be Particularly Susceptible to the Effects of Culture Shock. en


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